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athlete evolution power lifting

UNLEASH YOUR POTENTIAL

Optimising athletic potential through tailored training and expert guidance.

ABOUT ATHLETE EVOLUTION

Welcome to Athlete Evolution. We believe everyone can be an athlete and that everyone should have the opportunity to reach their full athletic potential. We exist to help children, adolescents, and adults reach their athletic potential. By extension, we exist to enable people to participate and enjoy their chosen activity or maximise their ability to perform in their chosen sport.

We are dedicated to helping athletes of all levels reach their full potential. Our team of experienced Exercise Physiologists specialise in prescribing training and rehabilitation programs tailored to each individual's unique needs and goals. With a focus on fundamental movement patterns, athletic development, and high-performance training, we're committed to helping our clients become stronger, faster, and more resilient. At Athlete Evolution, we believe that every athlete has the potential to achieve greatness, and we're here to help them get there.

Athlete performing a clean and jerk

MEET THE TEAM

Image of Trent Malcom a staff member at Athlete Evolution
Image of Rebecca McConnell a team member at Athlete Evolution
Image of Patrick Dossor a team member at Athlete Evolution

Trent Malcolm

Trent is the founder and director of Active One Health Professional Group. He has been an Accredited Exercise Physiologist since 2006, accumulating extensive experience in the golf industry as a consultant exercise physiologist. His experience includes consulting with the Australian Institute of Sport Golf Program, the Melbourne Golf Injury Clinic, Peninsula Kingswood Country Club and Bann Lynch McDade Golf Coaching. 

In addition, Trent is a former soccer player, cricketer and masters footballer and is currently a keen snow skier, mountain biker and long-distance runner. Trent has a sound understanding of the demands of multiple sports, which enables him to assess and prescribe highly effective exercise programs.

Rebecca McConnell

Bec McConnell has completed a Master’s Degree in Exercise Science and is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist. Her experience prior to joining Active One included 4 years of developing/delivering athletic development and strength and conditioning programs at sports academy schools.
She has a strong background in gymnastics as a former level 10 gymnast, state-level coach and an advanced level judge (for 10 + years). She has also been a state-level swimmer and currently pursues her athletic endeavours in the sport of Olympic Weightlifting.
Bec brings to Athlete Evolution an outstanding resume in elite-level sport, a wealth of knowledge, and a passion for helping children and adults be their best while having fun along the way!

Patrick Dossor

Pat completed a Masters Degree in Exercise Science and is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist. Prior to joining Active One, Pat has been heavily involved in a variety of athletic development and elite-level sporting roles. These include working with sports academy schools developing and implementing programs to enhance athleticism, working at Southern United (Women's National Premier League Soccer team) as a high-performance coach and coaching up to national level in Power Lifting.
Pat's sport of choice is power lifting, and he lives and breathes everything strength and conditioning. He blends his knowledge of sports science and high performance with a friendly, outgoing and enthusiastic personality.

Youth athletes lifting weights in a group class and having fun

OUR SERVICES

CHECK OUT OUR GROUP CLASSES

ASK ABOUT OUR 1:1 PERSONALISED SESSIONS

TESTIMONIALS
Youth athletes working together on resistance training in the Athlete Evolution group classes

Our sons Lenny & Harvey started working with Pat and Bec at Athlete Evolution when they were 14 and 12, respectively. After 12 months of training once, and sometimes twice per week, we have seen significant improvement in both their strength & condition. The boys now both move better, look more athletic and are much stronger. The work they have done on improving the quality of movement and focusing on technique has really made a difference.

Luke & Alison Saville

Picture of the logo on the wall at the Carrum Downs facility

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  • At what age can children start strength training?
    The appropriate age for children to start strength training can vary depending on factors such as their physical maturity, coordination, and individual needs. However, in general, children can begin basic strength training exercises as early as 7 or 8 years old, provided they are supervised by qualified instructors or coaches (Exercise Physiologists) and use proper technique. Here are some key considerations for determining when a child can start strength training: Physical Readiness: Children should have developed sufficient motor skills and coordination before beginning strength training. This typically occurs around ages 7 or 8, but it can vary from child to child. Interest and Motivation: Children should express an interest in strength training and be motivated to participate in structured exercise programs. It's important for strength training to be enjoyable and engaging for children to maintain their interest over time. Supervision and Instruction: Children should always be supervised by qualified instructors or coaches (Exercise Physiologists) who have experience working with youth and understand proper lifting techniques and safety protocols. Proper supervision is essential to ensure that children use appropriate form and avoid injury. Start with Bodyweight Exercises: Initially, children can begin with bodyweight exercises such as squats, lunges, push-ups, and planks to develop strength and coordination before progressing to using external weights or resistance. Gradual Progression: Strength training programs for children should emphasize proper technique and gradual progression in intensity and volume. Start with lighter resistance and fewer repetitions, and gradually increase the weight and intensity as the child becomes stronger and more proficient in their movements. Individualisation: Strength training programs should be individualised based on the child's age, physical development, and training goals. What works for one child may not be suitable for another, so it's important to tailor the program to meet the child's specific needs and abilities. Overall, while children as young as 7 or 8 years old can safely engage in strength training under proper supervision and guidance, it's essential to consider individual readiness and needs when determining when to start. Safety, proper technique, and enjoyment should always be prioritized in youth strength training programs.
  • How often should children/adolescents engage in strength training?
    The frequency of strength training for children depends on various factors, including their age, maturity level, physical readiness, and training goals. However, here are some general guidelines for frequency: Beginner Level (7-11 years old): Frequency: 1 to 2 sessions per week. Focus on learning proper technique and form with bodyweight exercises and light resistance. Allow for adequate rest between sessions to prevent overtraining and promote recovery. Intermediate Level (12-14 years old): Frequency: 2 to 3 sessions per week. Continue to emphasise proper technique and form while gradually increasing resistance and intensity. Include a variety of exercises targeting major muscle groups with appropriate supervision. Advanced Level (15+ years old): Frequency: 3 to 4 sessions per week. Focus on more advanced strength training techniques, to continue building strength and muscle mass. Incorporate a mix of compound and isolation exercises relevant to a chosen sport that enhance overall athletic performance. Rest and Recovery: Ensure children have at least one day of rest between strength training sessions to allow for adequate recovery. Encourage children to engage in other forms of physical activity, such as cardiovascular exercise, flexibility training, and sports participation, on non-strength training days to promote overall fitness and well-being. Listen to the Child's Body: Pay attention to signs of fatigue, soreness, or discomfort, and adjust the training frequency and intensity accordingly. Encourage open communication with children about how they feel during and after workouts to prevent overtraining and injury. Supervision and Guidance: Children should always be supervised by qualified instructors or coaches (Exercise Physiologists) who can ensure proper technique, form, and safety during strength training sessions. Coaches should monitor training loads and progressions to prevent excessive strain and reduce the risk of injury. Individualisation: Tailor the frequency and intensity of strength training sessions to meet the individual needs, abilities, and goals of each child. Consider factors such as sports participation, school workload, and other extracurricular activities when planning strength training schedules. Overall, the key is to strike a balance between challenging children to improve their strength and fitness while ensuring they have adequate rest and recovery to support their overall health and well-being.
  • Is it safe for children/adolescents to engage in strength training?
    Strength training, when appropriately supervised and tailored to a young athlete's age and physical development, is not only safe but also beneficial. Contrary to the myth that it stunts growth, research shows that it actually promotes bone density, strengthens muscles, and reduces the risk of sports-related injuries. At Athlete Evolution, our qualified exercise physiologists ensure that workouts are conducted with proper technique and gradual progression, making strength training a valuable part of youth athletic development and overall health. Read more here.
  • What are the benefits of strength training for athletic development in children/adolescents?
    Strength training offers numerous benefits for athletic development in children and adolescents. Some of these benefits include: Increased Strength: Strength training helps children develop their nervous system and strengthens connective tissue and muscle, which can improve their overall physical performance in sports and activities. Enhanced Power and Explosiveness: By improving the neurological system, muscle strength and power, strength training can enhance a child's ability to generate force quickly, which is essential for activities like sprinting, jumping, and throwing. Improved Athletic Performance: Strength training can enhance various athletic skills such as speed, agility, balance, and coordination, leading to improved performance in sports and physical activities. Injury Prevention: Strengthening connective tissue and muscles through strength training can help reduce the risk of sports-related injuries, such as strains, sprains, and fractures, by improving joint stability and biomechanics. Enhanced Bone Health: Weight-bearing strength training exercises promote bone growth and increase bone density, reducing the risk of osteoporosis and other bone-related conditions later in life. Positive Body Composition Changes: Strength training can help children and adolescents develop lean muscle mass while reducing body fat percentage, leading to a healthier body composition. Improved Self-Confidence: Achieving strength and fitness goals through consistent training can boost children's self-esteem and confidence, both on and off the field or court. Long-Term Health Benefits: Establishing healthy exercise habits early in life through strength training can lead to lifelong fitness habits and reduce the risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic health conditions. Psychological Benefits: Strength training provides an opportunity for children to set goals, overcome challenges, and experience a sense of accomplishment, fostering positive mental health and well-being. Skill Transferability: Many of the strength, power, and coordination gains achieved through strength training can transfer to a variety of sports and physical activities, making children more versatile and adaptable athletes. Overall, incorporating age-appropriate strength training into a child's or adolescent's athletic development program can have significant benefits for their physical health, performance, and overall well-being. However, it's essential to prioritise safety, proper technique, and supervision to ensure a positive and productive training experience.
  • What types of exercises are best for athletic development?
    Athletic development in children and adolescents can be fostered through a variety of exercises and activities. Here are some types of exercise that are particularly beneficial for athletic development: Strength Training: Age-appropriate strength training exercises can help children and adolescents develop muscular strength, endurance, and power. Bodyweight exercises, resistance bands, medicine balls, and free weights can be used to improve strength in various muscle groups. Cardiovascular Exercise: Aerobic activities such as running, swimming, cycling, and jumping rope improve cardiovascular fitness, endurance, and stamina. These activities also help burn calories, improve lung function, and support overall health. Agility and Speed Training: Agility drills, speed exercises, and plyometric workouts enhance agility, speed, coordination, and quickness. These exercises often involve rapid changes in direction, footwork drills, and jumping exercises to improve athletic performance in sports requiring quick movements. Flexibility and Mobility Training: Stretching exercises, yoga, and mobility drills promote flexibility, joint range of motion, and overall mobility. Flexibility training can help prevent injuries, improve posture, and enhance athletic performance by maintaining optimal movement patterns. Balance and Coordination Exercises: Balance boards, stability balls, and coordination drills challenge proprioception and balance, improving stability and coordination. Developing these skills is essential for sports performance and injury prevention. Sport-Specific Skills Practice: Practicing sport-specific skills and techniques is crucial for athletic development in specific sports. This may include drills, and game simulations designed to improve technical proficiency, decision-making, and tactical understanding. Cross-Training: Engaging in a variety of activities and sports can promote well-rounded athletic development, prevent overuse injuries, and enhance overall physical fitness. Encouraging children to participate in multiple sports and activities helps develop a broad base of movement skills and athletic abilities. Recovery and Rest: Adequate rest and recovery are essential components of athletic development. Encourage children to prioritize sufficient sleep, proper nutrition, hydration, and rest days to support muscle repair, growth, and overall recovery. Mental Conditioning: Mental skills training, such as visualization, goal setting, and positive self-talk, can enhance confidence, focus, and resilience in athletic performance. Mental conditioning is an integral part of athletic development alongside physical training. Overall, a well-rounded approach to athletic development should incorporate a combination of strength training, cardiovascular exercise, agility and speed training, flexibility and mobility training, sport-specific skill practice, cross-training, and mental conditioning. It's essential to tailor training programs to the individual needs, goals, and developmental stage of the child or adolescent to maximise their potential for success and enjoyment in sports and physical activity.
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